Archive for the 'Comics' Category

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PopMatters covers War of Streets and Houses for Canadian comics essay

PopMatters contributing editor Hans Rollman recently penned a piece about Canadian comics and their authors, and as part of his coverage Sophie Yanow’s War of Streets and Houses was written about.

Yanow’s work is a fascinating reflection on the significance a place can have; more fascinating still as the product of an American writer writing about Canada. And even more fascinating yet as one writing about Quebec: the sometimes-rebellious Francophone province which periodically threatens to separate from the rest of the country and has historically had a very contentious relationship with its Anglophone partners.

Read the full essay here. After that, order War of Streets and Houses from our website.

MariNaomi offers advice on ‘Writing People of Color’

MariNaomi contributed to Midnight Breakfast recently. She brought together a number of cartoonists, and had them provide advice for writers too intimated to write characters with cultural backgrounds different from their own.

Mare Odomo, Yumi Sakugawa and Whit Taylor are among those polled.

Part essay, part comics, you can read the entire piece here. Also, order Mari’s new book Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories, our co-publishing venture with 2D Cloud.

Sam Alden tours his comics collection for Comics&Cola

For her regular feature ‘Comics Shelfie’, Zainab Akhtar hosted Sam Alden at Comics&Cola to give a guided tour of his comics collection. It’s a cool little piece, and it’s a fun reminder that everyone – from the super talented to the not – has a book shelf they sometimes stare at.

Check it out here. Also, order Sam’s book It Never Happened Again, and place it on your own, private bookcase.

The State highlights War of Streets and Houses

Writer Adam Rothstein wrote a very thoughtful review of Sophie Yanow’s War of Streets and Houses. His piece appears over at The State.

The point is not to answer the questions, but to try to understand how we ended up with unanswerable questions to begin with. Like any person building a house, we can’t erase the city around us. We have to figure out how to build what we want in the environment we have.

Read Adam’s full review here. Order the Ignatz-nominated War of Streets and Houses from our website.

Sean T. Collins reviews Gabrielle Bell’s July Diary 2014

Over at The Comics Journal, Sean T. Collins took the time to write up a nice piece on Gabrielle Bell’s latest July Diary installment. It’s a fresh take, considering sequencing and setting’s role in Gabrielle’s overall play on anxiety.

At first glance, Gabrielle Bell’s six-panel daily diary comics don’t have a lot in common with the Mines of Moria sequence in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings . Or at any number of subsequent glances, I suppose. But the more Bell I read, the more I think they share a primary strength: a sense of space, of environment.

Read the full review here. Order Gabrielle’s latest, Truth is Fragmentary, which collects previous editions of her July Diary series.

MariNaomi interviewed, Books and Authors with Cary Barbor

MariNaomi was recently a guest of Cary Barbor’s Books and Authors podcast. She recorded an in-studio interview to discuss Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories.

You can listen to the show here. It’s a fairly short interview, just hitting the 17 minute mark.

Order Dragon’s Breath from our website, and follow Mari on Twitter.

War of Streets and Houses reviewed!

Shawn Starr posted an insightful essay on Sophie Yanow’s War of Streets and Houses, offering commentary on Sophie’s use of the comics grid.

Yanow’s panels though are free drawn, weaving up and down, veering to the right a little or the left. It is in these inconsistencies that we see the artist’s hand first and foremost, the nature of her line, rather than the uniformity found at the edge of a ruler. This naturalism goes straight to the heart of War of Streets and Houses; the city/comics grid may have its place, but the eccentricities of the individual community or artist come through first and foremost.

Read the full piece here. Order War of Streets and Houses from our website.

An Iranian Metamorphosis reviewed for Panel Patter

Scott Cederlund offers the first review of Mana Neyestani’s An Iranian Metamorphosis. It comes as part of Panel Patter‘s SPX Spotlight coverage.

What An Iranian Metamorphosis demonstrates is the power of the cartoon. It’s not something that we think of all that often. Our reviews and critiques mostly boil down to “buy it” or “don’t buy it.” We reduce the word and the image down to commodity and forget about the power that it really has.

Read Scott’s full review here. Order the book from our website.

BookTrib interviews MariNaomi

Tahneer Oksman caught up with MariNaomi to chat about memoir and her new book Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories for BookTrib.

BT: Some of your stories in Dragon’s Breath look so different from one another on the page. How did you initially decide on the length and style of each story?

MN: I never knew how long the stories were going to be. I didn’t plan out their length; I just sometimes needed more space to tell one story than I did another. There was one insanely busy month, when I was working on my Duran Duran story (“Heartthrobs”), which ended up being so long. I didn’t socialize or really leave the house; I was just furiously drawing all the time.

Read the full interview here. Order Mari’s book from the Uncivilized website.

Foreword Reviews highlights It Never Happened Again

Sam Alden’s latest received a brief nod from Foreword Reviews, an industry leader in small press publication.

Alden’s pencil drawings play beautifully with light and shadow. Each page uses just the right amount of detail, and no more, to accurately portray emotion.

You can read the full review here. Order It Never Happened Again from the Uncivilized Books website.