Archive for the 'Reviews' Category

Sean T. Collins reviews Gabrielle Bell’s July Diary 2014

Over at The Comics Journal, Sean T. Collins took the time to write up a nice piece on Gabrielle Bell’s latest July Diary installment. It’s a fresh take, considering sequencing and setting’s role in Gabrielle’s overall play on anxiety.

At first glance, Gabrielle Bell’s six-panel daily diary comics don’t have a lot in common with the Mines of Moria sequence in Peter Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings . Or at any number of subsequent glances, I suppose. But the more Bell I read, the more I think they share a primary strength: a sense of space, of environment.

Read the full review here. Order Gabrielle’s latest, Truth is Fragmentary, which collects previous editions of her July Diary series.

War of Streets and Houses reviewed!

Shawn Starr posted an insightful essay on Sophie Yanow’s War of Streets and Houses, offering commentary on Sophie’s use of the comics grid.

Yanow’s panels though are free drawn, weaving up and down, veering to the right a little or the left. It is in these inconsistencies that we see the artist’s hand first and foremost, the nature of her line, rather than the uniformity found at the edge of a ruler. This naturalism goes straight to the heart of War of Streets and Houses; the city/comics grid may have its place, but the eccentricities of the individual community or artist come through first and foremost.

Read the full piece here. Order War of Streets and Houses from our website.

An Iranian Metamorphosis reviewed for Panel Patter

Scott Cederlund offers the first review of Mana Neyestani’s An Iranian Metamorphosis. It comes as part of Panel Patter‘s SPX Spotlight coverage.

What An Iranian Metamorphosis demonstrates is the power of the cartoon. It’s not something that we think of all that often. Our reviews and critiques mostly boil down to “buy it” or “don’t buy it.” We reduce the word and the image down to commodity and forget about the power that it really has.

Read Scott’s full review here. Order the book from our website.

Foreword Reviews highlights It Never Happened Again

Sam Alden’s latest received a brief nod from Foreword Reviews, an industry leader in small press publication.

Alden’s pencil drawings play beautifully with light and shadow. Each page uses just the right amount of detail, and no more, to accurately portray emotion.

You can read the full review here. Order It Never Happened Again from the Uncivilized Books website.

Rob Clough reviews Eel Mansions #4-5, Houses of the Holy

The prolific Rob Clough reviewed some of our mini comics for his ‘Mini-Sweep’ column at Foxing Quarterly. He covered Eel Mansions #4 and 5 as well as Caitlin Skaalrud’s Houses of the Holy.

On Eel Mansions:

Eel Mansions is basically Van Gieson’s brain in a blender, mixing together dozens of comics and cultural touchstones into one package.

On Houses of the Holy:

Zak Sally was an obvious influence here, but Skaalrud works at a level more specifically in the style of comics-as-poetry, giving the verbal-visual tension a quality not unlike that of John Hankiewicz.

Read both full reviews here. You can order these minis from our website.

Mental Floss spotlights An Iranian Metamorphosis

Rich Barrett highlighted the “most interesting” debuts of the Small Press Expo for Mental Floss last week, and our book, An Iranian Metamorphosis, made the list.

Read the column here. It’s a great selection, which also includes Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories, our co-publishing project with 2D Cloud. Pre-order your copy of An Iranian Metamorphosis from our website.

 

Dragon’s Breath reviewed for Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly ran a short write-up of MariNaomi’s new book, Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories.

Award-winning author MariNaomi (Kiss and Tell) returns with this charming and intimate collection of vignettes and meatier personal histories … The mixed-bag effect of a whole life jumbled together lets the reader get to know the author much faster than in a traditional narrative.

Read the full review here. Pre-order Dragon’s Breath from our website.

It Never Happened Again, reviewed again and again!

Sam Alden’s latest, It Never Happened Again, has sealed even more reviews recently. First, Matt Derman from PopMatters wrote a nice feature on the book.

We worry about things that might not even happen and/or plan for things that are completely out of our control, when we should be soaking up whatever is right in front of us. Because even if it’s dull, mundane, or meaningless, it’s precious and it matters and it’ll never happen again.

Read Matt’s full thoughts here. You should also check out Matt’s blog, which he frequently updates.

Someone from guttergeek penned a nice piece as well on the title, zeroing in on Sam’s current popularity.

“Anime,” his best work to date, more than stands up to the considerable pressure a young cartoonist faces when declared “most likely” by his profession. This is a volume, and a cartoonist, that in every way lives up to those expectations and sets us up for beautiful things to come.

Read the full review here. Also, order Sam’s book if you haven’t yet. And he’ll be at SPX this weekend, if you’re there.

Ed vs. Yummy Fur reviewed for Vol. 1 Brooklyn

Tobias Carroll wrote a nice review of Brian Evenson’s Ed vs. Yummy Fur for Vol. 1 Brooklyn:

As long as multiple versions of works from Smile to Star Wars to Raymond Carver’s short stories have existed, debates have raged about authorial intent and personal preference. Evenson’s book is, among its many other qualities, an extended meditation on these issues. It’s also another window into a creative work that’s frustrating, vulgar, and–for me, anyway–utterly captivating.

Read the full review here. Order Ed vs. Yummy Fur from our website. It’s the first of our Critical Cartoons series.

Patrick Kyle’s Distance Mover reviewed

James Kaplan reviewed Patrick Kyle’s upcoming Distance Mover for Panel Patter. The book will be published by Koyama Press, and it will debut at the Small Press Expo Sept. 13-14th.

This is an entertaining, interesting science-fiction story, in the tradition of Dr. Who and other stories about advanced being traveling from world to world (or place to place) …

Read the full review here.

We recently published Patrick’s contribution to our Structures series, which you can order here.