Archive for the 'Reviews' Category

Incidents in the Night at The Quietus

Aug Stone reviewed David B.’s Incidents in the Night for The Quietus’ comic book random-up column. “As ever, the French cartoonist excels at portraying the mysterious and intriguing that lurks under the visibility of life on the surface.”

Read the review here. You can pre-order Book 2 on our website at a special discount!

Eel Mansions at Mental Floss

Rich Barrett reviewed Eel Mansions for his column at Mental Floss. “Probably the most Lynchian (as in filmmaker David Lynch) comic to be made since Dan Clowes’ 1993 graphic novel Like A Velvet Glove Cast in Iron, Derek Van Gieson’s Eel Mansions has plenty of Eraserhead’s confusing imagery but with Twin Peaks’ wry sense of humor as well.”

Read the review here. Order Eel Mansions from our website.

The Chicago Tribune reviews Carl Barks’ Duck

For the Chicago Tribune, Jake Austen penned a great review of Peter Schilling Jr.’s Carl Bark’s Duck. We recently published this book, and we’re extremely proud that its first review is in the Tribune.

Read the piece here, and order the book from our website.

An Iranian Metamorphosis reviewed at The Comics Journal

Greg Hunter has written a fair review of Mana Neyestani’s An Iranian Metamorphosis for The Comics Journal. “There’s value in firsthand insights about the workings and abuses of power, especially insights originating from places that move to restrict them.”

Read Greg’s review here. You can purchase the book on our website.

The 9th Blog reviews Eel Mansions

Derek Van Gieson’s Eel Mansions received a great review from The 9th Blog. It’s described as “a world of blacks and whites and pseudo-grays and polka dots,” which feels fairly apt.

Read the full piece here, and order Eel Mansions from our website.

An Iranian Metamorphosis reviewed!

Book Riot Contributing Editor Swapna Krishna wrote a very nice review of Mana Neyestani’s An Iranian Metamorphosis for her personal blog. She says it’s “a great choice for someone interested in reading more comics but unsure of where to start.”

You can read the full piece here, and order the book from our website.

Layers of Thought reviews An Iranian Metamorphosis

The blog Layers of Thought ran a nice review of Mana Neyestani’s An Iranian Metamorphosis.

This is a powerful and eye-opening story, that is told with the help of some excellent illustrations and plenty of dark humor. You get an insider’s view of some of the complex political, cultural, ethnic and authoritarian issues within the Islamic Republic – and it is not a pretty picture.

Read the full piece here. Order An Iranian Metamorphosis from our website.

MariNaomi’s Dragon’s Breath reviewed!

A blog dedicated to Asian American Literature has published a nice review of MariNaomi’s book Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories. They call the book “a highly recommended read from a new and exciting independent publisher.” Those publishers being 2D Cloud and Uncivilized Books.

You can read the full piece here. Order Dragon’s Breath from our website.

The New York Times spotlights An Iranian Metamorphosis

For the Sunday Book Review, Douglas Wolk and The New York Times ran a short piece on Mana Neyestani’s An Iranian Metamorphosis.

He remolds the exhausting terrors of his life’s worst months into grim comedy, and presents his friends and adversaries alike as mad-eyed, putty-bodied grotesques, crosshatched with a political caricaturist’s wicked eye for frailties.

Read the full piece here. Order An Iranian Metamorphosis from our website.

This Is Infamous reviews An Iranian Metamorphosis

Shea Hennum has reviewed Mana Neyestani’s An Iranian Metamorphosis for the website This Is Infamous.

And while comparing it—in any way—to a gag comic featuring loads and loads of poop jokes may seem like an incongruous way to talk about a Franco-Belgian comic regarding a man and his wife having to flee their oppressive government that’s cartooned by an Iranian refugee, almost like I’m being overly flip about fairly serious subject matter, I do think that one of the book’s, and one of Neyestani’s, greatest strengths is its ability to interject a shocking and much-needed amount of levity into a book that is beset on all sides by the cruelest, most frightening, most hopeless types of narratives. At the core of AN IRANIAN METAMORPHOSIS is Neyestani’s unrelenting humanity, and the book is never anything but an emotive vehicle of expression.

Read the entire review here, and order An Iranian Metamorphosis from our website.