Tag Archive for 'Eel Mansions'

Comics Bulletin ‘brings it all back home’ with Eel Mansions #6

Concluding a very extensive conversation series, Daniel Elkin and Keith Silva wrote about Eel Mansions #6 over at Comics Bulletin.

You say Eel Mansions #6 “brings it all back home.” While, it could be easy to see this as some sort of Outlaw Blues, I’ll inherently choose track 11, Baby Blue. While Van Gieson is drawing crazy patterns on our sheets, he’s no empty handed painter. A matter of fact, he’s going big, and remember what Janet teaches us in her final Milk City, “If something is big, then it’s art, and if it’s small, it’s not art.” After all, it’s good to keep things simple.

This kind of thinking is inevitable when dealing with something like Eel Mansions, issue six in particular. This train of thought cuts through the snowy mountain passes of traditional narrative and ends up making stops along the way questioning the nature of storytelling and fueling up at the depot concerning what makes comics, comics.

You can read the entire piece here. Parts 1 – 5 are found here. Pre-order Derek Van Gieson’s collected Eel Mansions from our website!

l’étoile interviews Derek Van Gieson

Derek (Eel Mansions) Van Gieson and Edie Overturf recently opened an exhibition with Public Functionary titled “In Search Of …”, and l’étoile, and an interesting Twin Cities arts mag, caught up with them to discuss it.

The premise for In Search Of… revolves around the act of narration and the authenticity and origin of narratives. In it, you’ve created the story of five fictional “tribes,” developed distinctively and secretively from one another and then webbed into a collaboration. Tell us a little more about the concept behind this exhibit.

DVG: Edie and I are both world builders, there’s so much mind digging going on that we aren’t particularly interested in representing what’s directly in front of us, rather, we enjoy combining the past, which is filled with so many versions of truth, fantasy and allegory, with our own imagination. The legends are fact and the facts have no history. It’s an exciting mess and the past is constantly being rewritten or re-understood. It’s a fantastic meeting place and baseline for us as artists to meet and the concept of the show was a natural progression from that. Edie’s work always asks questions and I enjoyed that, and so the show is a huge collection of questions. It’s meant to be mysterious, it’s meant for the viewer to fill in the gaps. It’s about making connections and making a point that the world’s history is shaped by the imagination.

City Pages also covered the event, which you can read here.

The exhibition will run through October 17th. The gallery space is open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays.

For more on Public Functionary, visit their website. You can read the full Q&A with l’étoile here. And, of course, pre-order Derek’s new book Eel Mansions from Uncivilized Books.

Rob Clough reviews Eel Mansions #4-5, Houses of the Holy

The prolific Rob Clough reviewed some of our mini comics for his ‘Mini-Sweep’ column at Foxing Quarterly. He covered Eel Mansions #4 and 5 as well as Caitlin Skaalrud’s Houses of the Holy.

On Eel Mansions:

Eel Mansions is basically Van Gieson’s brain in a blender, mixing together dozens of comics and cultural touchstones into one package.

On Houses of the Holy:

Zak Sally was an obvious influence here, but Skaalrud works at a level more specifically in the style of comics-as-poetry, giving the verbal-visual tension a quality not unlike that of John Hankiewicz.

Read both full reviews here. You can order these minis from our website.

Eel Mansions 5 Now Shipping

Eel Mansions 5 finally arrives after debuting at MoCCA! Here’s what Derek Van Gieson has in store:

Infamous cartoonist Janet Planet, plots to kill her golden goose, the negative orphans continue their prepubescent existentialisms, records store guys do their thing, government agents Bert and Chee Chee continue their adventures in hell, and Satanist Wuppeteer, Armistead Fowler’s past further unfolds. Plus, Milk City, Tales of Abstraction House, and Doomin!

And he didn’t even mention this amazing multi-page Demon vs. Air Force battle! (see below) Get your copy here. Oh and don’t forget we have subscriptions available for the budget conscious.

Eel Mansions 4: The Massive Review

It’s a tradition now. Every new issue of Derek Van Gieson’s Eel Mansions requires a critics round table dissecting the themes and pop cultural minutiae that snake (eel?) their way through each issue. Keith Silva and Daniel Elkin and company are up to issue 4 now. Here are a few things they say:

Eel Mansions is the closest thing to being inside another person’s head I can get, and I love it. I adore the six-panel pages, thematic establishing shots for what has come, what will come, what you wish might come. The oscillation between South Park-level expressive grotesquerie and faces like those I see every day. I can see why you guys find cannon-balling into the depths so rewarding, and like all good works you get out what you put in, but for me, Eel Mansions is an indie soap opera, too smart for cliffhangers or page-turn reveals, but nevertheless dependent on the well placed non-sequitur.

[…]

If you can’t pick ”the Mick Fleetwood statue” out of a Hellscape Bert and Chee Chee find themselves in than you don’t get it and won’t get it and that’s O.K.

[…]

Think of the Doomin P.S.A in this issue where the figure bemoans how Motown has been ruined for him(?) by corporate consumerism and over-exposure. The Doomin Dancers step in to reveal the beautiful belly underneath the behemoth. The gritty gems of R. Dean Taylor, the bat shit crazy drama of The Hit Pack, Chris Clark’s haunting “I Want To Go Back There Again” — the sound track to Eel Mansions is a love letter to the possibilities the individual creator can bring, even within the concrete dictates of corporate culture. The independent artist will always find a way. Van Gieson has all of his narrative layers infused with this realization, the heartbeat of creation, the procreant urge (again) of love.

Read the whole thing here.

Also, don’t forget that issue 5 was just released! We’re about to send copies to subscribers and pre-order customers. Order now!

Eel Mansions #5

Is is #5 already?! It is! Derek Van Gieson’s unstoppable Eel Mansions series has reached #5. Infamous cartoonist Janet Planet, plots to kill her golden goose, the negative orphans continue their pre-pubesent existentialisms, records store guys do their thing, government agents Bert and Chee Chee continue their adventures in hell, and Satanist Wuppeteer, Armistead Fowler’s past further unfolds. Plus, Milk City, Tales of Abstraction House, and Doomin!

Now is a good time to get into Eel Mansions, we have issues 1-4 on sale! Number 5 will debut at MoCCA and will ship in April soon after. Available now for pre-order!

Another Epic Eel Mansions Review

The Comics Bulletin published another of their massive & epic Eel Mansions reviews. This time they focus on issue 3:

Eel Mansions is oozing with love — all the kinds of love there are. It’s thick with the act of creation — fecund one might say — for all acts of creation emanate from some kind of love — you know, what Lou Reed meant when he said, ”between thought and expression there lies a lifetime.” And this is a book that celebrates the creative act. From the cartoonist to the musician, from the family man to the Wuppeteer, everybody is or was Making It — ”make some room now, dig what you see” — taking the ephemera of experience and the hope of ideas and baking something new in the oven.

What is art but an expression of love?

And there’s a LOT more here. Now is a good time to check out Eel Mansions, all four current issues are on sale!

Eel Mansions Epic

Look what happens when you step away from the interwebs for a few hours! An enormous, giant, epic review (on The Comics Bulletin site) of Eel Mansions #2! It’s so big, it needed two writers! It’s really impossible to describe, so just go and read what Keith and Daniel have to say. Here’s just a tiny excerpt about the anxiety of influence:

Maybe this is the ‘uncertainty principle’ you mentioned, Elkin, the bit about: ‘uncertainty between what has come before and the possibilities of the road untraveled?’ Do these characters suffer from an anxiety of influences? Weaned on the tit of late 20th century pop culture, do they struggle to transcend these cultural touchstones that have made them who they are? And as creative folk, interpreters of our culture, mirror-holder-uppers, is this a problem? Because there’s always going to be a Jaque who asks: ”Do you even like Jazz?” or ”Does the funny animal genre make it easier for you to dispense your unpopular opinons?” and ”How long do you intend to run away?”

There is SO MUCH MORE! The whole thing is a really fun read. Check it out! And then, get your own copy here!

Eel Mansions + Post York are Tops

Justin Giampaoli just posted his Best of 2013 list on Thirteen Minutes. We are proud to see two Uncivilized Books titles on the list:

Post York (by James Romberger + Crosby): Set in a post-apocalyptic New York City that thematically values humanitarianism over sheer survival, Post York seeks to re-examine man’s relationship to the natural world. This was the offering from Uncivilized Books that grabbed me by the throat and made me pay full attention to this bold new publishing house helmed by Tom Kaczynski.

Eel Mansions (by Derek Van Gieson): It’s like David Lynch on paper, flirtatious, mysterious, and dangerous. Van Gieson laces this burgeoning series with so much addictive critical bait, from cinema, to music, to cultural anthropology observations, that it quickly becomes an irresistible entryway to a never-ending conversation between the handful of people who can keep up with what Van Gieson is slinging with so much affection.

Read the rest, it’s a great list!

P.S. Check out some of our specials running until the end of the year.

 

Eel Mansions No. 4

Derek Van Gieson has been busy! He recently delivered the fourth issue of his well regarded series Eel Mansions! This issue gives us a bit of Armistead Fowler’s murky past, Lizard Lord Wilma is on the run from the Zapf, the proper mix of Iggy & The Stooges “Raw Power” is given its due, and more of Janet Planet, Doomin, Milk City, and Tales of Abstraction House. It’s another 40+ page monster! Is anybody else producing 40 page mini-comics on a such a regular basis? Available now for pre-order! Copies will start shipping at the beginning of December. Oh and don’t forget that Eel Mansions subscriptions are also available, don’t miss an issue!