Archive for the 'Comics' Category

Patrick Kyle’s Distance Mover reviewed

James Kaplan reviewed Patrick Kyle’s upcoming Distance Mover for Panel Patter. The book will be published by Koyama Press, and it will debut at the Small Press Expo Sept. 13-14th.

This is an entertaining, interesting science-fiction story, in the tradition of Dr. Who and other stories about advanced being traveling from world to world (or place to place) …

Read the full review here.

We recently published Patrick’s contribution to our Structures series, which you can order here.

Fall 2014 Books and Subscription

We’re happy to announce the Fall 2014 books and subscription. This season we have 3 new books: Incidents in the Night Book 2 by David B., Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories by MariNaomi and the hugely anticipated Eel Mansions by Derek Van Gieson. The subscription is $55 (almost 20% off cover price!) + free shipping.

PLUS, as tradition dictates, the first 50 subscribers will also get 3 free mini-comics! We don’t know what they’ll be yet, but you know we make great minis!

Get your subscription here and find out more about the books here.

Pre-order Sam Alden’s Frontier #5

The talented Sam Alden wrote and drew a new story for Frontier #5, the latest issue of Youth in Decline‘s ongoing monograph series. The cover is above. A description resides below.

This issue includes a new 36-page comic, which deals with family legacies, summer vacation, and sinkholes. 2 colors printed on Risograph.

You can pre-order the book here. It will debut at SPX.

Joann Sfar’s Pascin mentioned in Minneapolis Star Tribune

Last Friday, Claude Peck of the Minneapolis Star Tribune wrote a short blurb, previewing our October release of Joann Sfar’s Pascin.

Wine, women and paint defined artist Jules Pascin, whose Bohemian passion flamed out when he committed suicide in Paris in 1930, at age 45. Born in Bulgaria to a Spanish father and an Italian Serbian mother, Pascin traveled in the American South before settling in Paris, where his free-love, heavy-drinking lifestyle earned him the title “Prince of Montparnasse.” Pascin’s life, which seems to have included bedding many of his models, comes vividly alive in the graphic novel …

Read the whole blurb here. Pre-order Pascin from our website.

Gabrielle Bell rounds out July 2014

Hopefully you’ve followed Gabrielle Bell’s great series of July diary comics this year. She decided to post her entries throughout the month of August, and this week marks the end. If you haven’t followed along, no problem. You can easily visit her website and quickly take the plunge.

For the moment, we’ll link to Friday’s entry, July 21st.

Also, order Gabrielle’s latest book Truth is Fragmentary. If you like these latest snippets, you may as well know the whole story.

It Never Happened Again reviewed!

Sam Alden’s It Never Happened Again is racking up reviews! This time, Rob McMonigal from Panel Patter and Robert Boyd from The Great God Pan is Dead are the critics in questions. Here’s what they’re saying:

There’s a sequence in Anime that is absolutely amazing, though, because it shows that comics can convey a sense of movement, even in static images. Over the course of about 15 panels, Alden focuses not on Janet or the passengers or the plane itself, but what she can see out the window. At one point, all the reader has to look at are a few tiny dots, because they are out over the ocean. You can “see” the plane move as a result, thanks to the framing device, focus, and selection of images presented in this tight window on the action. Though it’s probably the least-detailed part of the book, in some ways it’s the most powerful, and shows just how much thought goes into Alden’s work.

Read the full Panel Patter review here.

James Joyce wrote that the moment of an epiphany in a story was when “the soul of the commonest object … seems to us radiant, and may be manifested through any chance, word or gesture.” Alden finds this in “Hawaii 1997.”

Read Robert’s full thoughts here.

Order Sam’s book because it’s really good.

Gabrielle Bell draws herself for BuzzFeed

BuzzFeed asked 23 female cartoonists to draw their bodies, and Gabrielle Bell was one of them. She contributes a short strip about swimming naked in a river, done up in her classic diary comic style. Others included are Vanessa Davis, Hope Larson and Roberta Gregory.

You can check out the full list here. Order Gabrielle’s latest, Truth is Fragmentary, from our website.

Two Nominations!

The 2014 Ignatz nominees were announced yesterday, and we’re ecstatic both Sophie Yanow’s War of Streets and Houses and Kevin Huizenga and Dan Zettwoch’s Amazing Facts and Beyond were recognized! It’s such a great list of books this year, so we’re kind of blown away to be among them.

Sophie’s been on a streak of late. Along with releasing such a great book this year, she did an excellent interview for The Atlantic (read here) and received a wonderful review from Rob Clough at The Comics Journal.

Indeed, the abstractness of her line combined with the artificial solidity of the zip-a-tone gives the protest scenes a strange quality that would be difficult to capture in a more naturalistic style. It’s as though the adrenaline and fear she experienced rendered the experience no more than a set of rushing lines. It’s sort of a flip-side to Joe Sacco’s slightly cartoony naturalism in capturing an environment; indeed, with her pupils blotted out by the white circles of her glasses much like Sacco, they are not dissimilar both in terms of intent and execution. The difference is that Yanow is not a temporary visitor, but someone who chose to live and work in Montreal.

War of Streets and Houses is nominated for Outstanding Graphic Novel.

Kevin and Dan’s Amazing Facts and Beyond was well reviewed by Publishers Weekly, which is cool. But Jeopardy Champion Ken Jennings is a fan, so that’s obviously super, super cool.

I feel like a pretty well-informed guy, but the great Leon Beyond taught me something new on virtually every page of this beautiful collection. Indispensable!”

Amazing Facts and Beyond is nominated for Outstanding Anthology or Collection.

Order the books here and here.

Congrats to all the nominees. See you at SPX!

It Never Happened Again reviewed by Slate!

Sam Alden’s It Never Happened Again received a great review from writer Dan Kois and The Slate Book Review.

Alden’s natural sense of framing and pace, his willingness to use silent panels to tell stories, and his beautiful (yes, beautiful) pencil images combined to open my eyes to a new idea of what a great comic can be. It helps that he’s also an excellent writer—both stories sketch out lonely, lost characters efficiently, and put them each through very different quests for meaning.

Read the whole review here, and order your copy of It Never Happened Again, already. Alright!?

Jon Lewis cameo in Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips’s Fatale

Comic Book Resources published an interesting interview with Ed Brubaker yesterday, discussing the series wrap on he and Sean Phillips’s Fatale.

Jon Lewis appears in the book for a story set in Seattle in the 90s, and while his character ends up dead, it’s still a cool nod. It reads like a companion piece to Brubaker’s introduction to True Swamp: Choose Your Poison.

A lot of people didn’t think they were going to stop in Seattle in the ’90s, Ed.

Yeah. I was stuck there for a long time in the ’90s. [Laughter] It was a lot of fun, though. A few of my old friends from the indie comics scene really loved that arc because it felt like I was taking what I do now and blending it with something like “Lowlife.” Two of the main characters in the band in that story are based on old cartoonist friends of mine — Jon Lewis and Tom Hart. We used to be roommates in a house together and do zines and stuff. So a lot of that stuff was real things we’d talk about. It feels real to me because they’re some of my oldest friends. It was a lot of fun to put them in my comic and kill them. [Laughs] I warned them ahead of time when they gave me permission to use their likenesses that they would probably die badly.

Read the full interview here. Also, check out Jon’s work. It paints an interesting picture of a certain era. Order True Swamp: Choose Your Poison here.